Sunday, December 26, 2010

Why The Joker?



Why The Joker?

Why... The Joker...?

Ever dance with the devil in the pale moonlight?


Hoo hahahahahahahaaa!

Haahahahahahahahahaa!

Bwahahahahahahahahahahahaaa!

Why The Joker...?

Why so serious?









14 comments:

  1. "The Joke's on You"

    Premise: The Joker has kidnapped Gordon's estranged wife and son and turned himself in, but refuses to divulge their location.

    PAGE ???

    Standard 3x3 panel grid.

    1) Extreme close-up of the Joker's grin. It fills the panel.

    2) Police interrogation room. Gordon is sitting across from Joker at a table. Joker is heavily restrained. We are looking over Gordon's shoulder at the Joker, who grins while maintaining his cold stare.

    GORDON: I know you think this is funny.

    3) Same as before, except Gordon is starting to stand up. Joker maintains his stare.

    GORDON: You're trying to provoke a reaction from me.

    4) Gordon has paced behind Joker now. Joker continues grinning and staring straight ahead, almost at us.

    GORDON: You think you're making a point.

    5) We see Gordon and Joker through the two-way glass. Gordon standing behind Joker. There is no-one on the other side. No-one watching.

    GORDON: I got the whole MCU out looking for my family, while I'm stuck here with you.

    6) Inverted POV now; we are looking at the two-way mirror, reflecting Gordon and Joker. Gordon is walking around the table again.

    GORDON: I know you think you're untouchable. That there's nothing I can threaten you with.

    7) Back to the Joker staring at us, grinning. Gordon has almost lapped the table.

    GORDON: That's why you do these things: Make us feel bad for caring. Pretend that you don't have such "weaknesses".

    8) Gordon is standing behind the Joker again, leaning close to his ear. The Joker is still grinning, still staring.

    GORDON: But that's bulls#@t. 'Cause I know the one thing you do care about...

    GORDON: (v.small) Batman.

    9) Extreme close-up of the Joker's grin again, only this time he's no longer smiling.

    END OF PAGE.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Odd, I though I'd posted this already. Guess not, so here it is again.

    The Joker - My Own Worst Critic by MK Stangeland Jr.

    (6 Panels)

    For this page, the panels should be slightly askew and not level in order to better emphasis the chaotic nature of THE JOKER and THE JOKESTER facing off against one another.

    Panel 1: THE JOKER attempts to stab THE JOKESTER with the blade he previously pulled from his cane. JOKESTER dodges.

    JOKER: I’d prefer to get right to the point!

    Panel 2: THE JOKESTER, now wielding his hammer, swings it at THE JOKER and knocks the blade out of his hand.

    JOKESTER: No need to hammer things home!

    Panel 3: JOKER catches JOKESTER by the wrist. Electrical lines around his hand reveal that he’s armed with his lethal joy buzzer.

    JOKER: Coming from you, that’s shocking!

    Panel 4: The arm held by JOKER pulls out of JOKESTER’s sleeve, revealing that it was a fake. The real arm can be see coming out of the sleeve to replace the fake one.

    His other arm, also faked out - for an extend-o-glove in this case - stretches out to hit JOKER in the face.


    JOKESTER: Has anyone ever told you you could stand to work on your punch lines?

    Panel 5: A small amount of acid squirts out of JOKER’s lapel flour and hits JOKESTER on the jacket.

    JOKER: Should have seen my last routine. Knocked the audience dead!

    Panel 6 JOKESTER is able to get his jacket off before the acid causes him any harm. This also reveals that underneath his jacket, he is wearing another jacket exactly like it.

    A number of prank weapons fall off the JOKESTER as he gets his outer jacket off, including the previously mentioned extend-o-glove, a whoopee cushion, a rubber chicken, THE JOKESTER’s own joy buzzer, and one of those squishy alien toy whatchamacallit thingamajigs – you know the one.


    JOKESTER: What a waste – I’m usually struggling to get my audiences alive in the first place.

    End Page

    ReplyDelete
  3. Okay, here's mine--with this, I tried to really design the page, sort-of a low-tech version of what J.H. Williams III tries to do. Let me know how it works. It's pretty big, so it needs to be it's own comment.

    ReplyDelete
  4. PAGE (--): 9 panels in three rows—one large panel on the first row, four panels in the second and third rows.

    PANEL ONE: Entire first row. We are in the last place anyone would want to be—The Joker’s cell in Arkham Asylum. He sits on his bed, head and back reclined on the hard stone wall. The cell is dark and foreboding—Joker mostly in shadow, the only things seen is his wide eyes and his wider grin. He’s watching Batman standing outside his glass door into the Asylum, placing a manila folder, opened with police files and gruesome pictures inside, onto the glass door to Joker’s cell.
    BATMAN (1): Thomas Friedman, age 36, found dead in his apartment from 47 stab wounds to his face, chest, and genitals. The only thing recognizable about his face, apart from his teeth, was a crude smile, painted with watercolor paint from ear to ear.
    BATMAN (2): Sandra Lovit, age 29, found in a dumpster behind a Chinese food restaurant on 238th and Adams, dead from strangulation by a steel wire with elaborate feathers wrapped around it to appear like a boa still wrapped around the neck. A similar smile was painted on her face.
    BATMAN (3): Finally, the most recent and most public case—Jeffrey Talborn, age 58, was stripped, beaten severely, had a steel cable wrapped around his neck like a noose, and thrown off the top story of his office skyscraper. He was discovered by his employees dangling from the 63rd floor, his neck broken, and—
    JOKER (4): A white smile painted over his face.
    JOKER (5): Heheheheh—
    JOKER (6): You were the kid that droned on during show and tell in Kindie-garden, weren’t you? So what’s your point?
    BATMAN (7): Surely you can see the pattern?

    PANEL 2: A thin panel on the second row, only shows Batman’s eyes slitted in anger.
    BATMAN (8): There’s a copy-cat serial killer loose in Gotham—and he’s stealing your act.

    ReplyDelete
  5. PANEL 3: Panels 3 and 4 are linked together—3 being outside Joker’s cell and 4 being inside, and the border between the two panels representing the window between them. Chest high profile shot of Batman from outside the cell, still holding the papers to the cell window—or the border of the panel on the page. All of Batman’s dialogue will come from this panel, and Joker’s from the neighboring panel.
    JOKER (9): (outside of panel) I do see it—and don’t call me Shirley.
    JOKER (10): (outside of panel) Hehehehaha—
    JOKER (11): (outside of panel) But why do you want my help? You’re the “World’s Greatest Detective,” you’ve figured out my schemes more times than I’ve changed my undies! Can’t you figure it out on your own?

    PANEL 4: As mentioned, inside Joker’s cell, Joker is no longer reclining, but sitting on the edge of the bed, angled to meet Batman’s eyes.
    BATMAN (12): (outside of panel) I could, but other people might die before I figure out his MO and stop him.
    BATMAN (13): (outside of panel) Plus, I know that the idea of someone trying to imitate your style would burn you to no end, so you’ll let me pick your brain as a shortcut to his.

    PANEL 5: A thin, tight panel similar to 2, except this time its Joker’s eyes—open wide, the pupil in his right eye far more dilated than his left (think how Tony Daniel drew him in Batman: RIP).
    BATMAN (14): (outside of panel) Use the veteran mass-murderer to catch the rookie.

    ReplyDelete
  6. PANEL 6: Same size as 2 & 5, this time showing Batman’s mouth—tight-lipped and appearing calm and set, but his teeth gritting together.
    JOKER (15): (outside of panel) Okay, Clarice, I’ll help you out.
    JOKER (16): (outside of panel) But know this—

    PANEL 7: Like 3 and 4, this panel and panel 8 should feel like a long shot of Batman and Joker facing off, with the cell walls being the border of the panels. This panel has Batman, putting the manila folder away, seemingly tucking it under his cape.
    JOKER (17): (outside of panel) Me and whoever this kid is, we have nothing in common. He might think so, but we don’t.
    JOKER (18): (outside of panel) I plan my kills the same way a comedian writes jokes—telling a truth outside of our normal world. Kid might have it in him—the boa was a lovely touch—but his rule of threes is just terrible.
    JOKER (19): (outside of panel) He’s just killing for killing’s sake.

    PANEL 8: Inside Joker’s cell. Now Joker is standing up, leering at Batman, face pressed against the glass.
    JOKER (20): Believe me, Bats—if I just started to simply murder people…

    PANEL 9: Like panel 6, this show’s Joker’s wide, almost unnatural grin.
    JOKER (21): There’d be none of you left.

    ReplyDelete
  7. great scripts guys, wish i had a take on the joker haha

    ReplyDelete
  8. JD - great idea. Gordon threatening the only thing Joker cares about... not sure how he'd pull it off convincingly, but it's a great play, as long as Joker doesn't call his bluff.

    MK - lots of fun. I wasn't familiar with the Jokester (just googled him) but this face-off offers endless possibilities.

    Jared - loved it, particularly the closing line. No way you'd get all that dialogue onto one page and still have room for the art though.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Rol - Thanks, man! This idea always seemed a no-brainer to me, and Gordon is the only person who could ever really get the drop on Batman when you think about it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yeah, I thought while doing it I might just try a Bendis-like thing, but I guess I even topped him. How many words would you say can fit on a page?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I guess it depends how much work you're also asking the artist to do. Bendis might fill a page with that much dialogue but only have one or two panels.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Jared - don't tell the other guys around here but I'm going to call your page legal. You've just written the greatest double page spread in the history of thoughtballoons.

    I love the method you've gone to to make this page work and it does completely work, on many levels. It really draws the reader in and it punches them hard at the end. I was swept away with what you've put here. It was an absolute pleasure to read.

    Now don't do it again, we can't have everyone writing double-pagers, the dialogue will bog this site down like you've never seen before. :)

    @J.D. - Not a bad little page, could probably be cropped down a little but it also just works really well with all those panels of build up. Not bad at all.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Ryan: Yeah, I can see that bogging down the site--it actually took me a few tries to submit it.

    But I'll take what you're saying to heart. I'll try not to be so wordy next time, and I'll try to not have your praise go directly to my head. :P

    ReplyDelete

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